Questions about Salary Pt 1: Wonder Woman Case Study

I can already foresee this topic being a multi-post segment. Salary is something that fascinates me, because I am starting to learn that there is more to it than previous realized. Also, since I hardly make enough money to survive/cover my living expenses, I know now in hindsight that I have made many mistakes and poor choices. This realization has been incredibly tough to swallow because I went to college and have always done “the right thing.”

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not referencing my college education to claim that I automatically deserve a six-figure salary. I only mean to emphasize that I followed the steps and took action to try improve my salary–that I didn’t just sit there and expect for it to happen. I have always tried to better my financials but with it never rising to respectable level, I started looking out to the world for knowledge. There could be something that I missed or some task that I failed to complete. I am starting to uncover that salary/pay is a highly complex issue. I search for what I can discover, so that I can share it with you.

It is relevant and essential any working soul to be as enlightened with income as possible.

So, enough of my blabbing and onto the topic at hand–Wonder Woman. I wanted to reference this article from Glamour (you can click on ‘Glamour’ or use the link referenced below) which explained how the gorgeous star of Wonder Woman–Gal Gadot–earned only $300,000.00 for her role. As of this post, the movie has already earned $397 million in the domestic box office alone.

I’m sure most people would be happy to earn $300,000.00 and I personally joke how that’s probably all I’ll earn in my lifetime of employment. But I still feel annoyed on Gadot’s behalf, you’d think I was her sister since I am that bothered by it.

I hope that she will renegotiate more for future roles because she is earning what many top actors make per television episode despite starring in a feature full-length film that is guaranteed toys sales and sequels.

The happy ending to this story is that Gadot is not bothered by her salary and I am glad to know she isn’t troubled by it.

Learning about her salary has given food for thought towards the question of what actors should earn in their roles. Most people would probably laugh, shouting that they are paid what their “name brings in” or something along those lines. I have to ask, why? Why is an actor only paid by the perception of their name? I can think of countless movies which bombed, despite their big-name headliners. Gadot could have been in countless projects but then this happened to be her first starring role. I find that to be insulting, because if someone has the experience, wouldn’t that be enough for a higher paycheck?

In the land of Hollywood, I would think not.

It’s all connected to the perception of your name. To bring this all in, what I am starting to learn about salaries is that a lot of it has to do with perception–what people think you should earn. Even though we all might not be Hollywood actors, a lot of those same assumptions of what we should earn are placed upon us. Unfortunately, by us taking those lower offers and not fighting for more pay (which I am certainly guilty of) we are doomed to earn drastically less than we should.

Even if we might be grateful in the moment for what we have, the problem lies more over time when we started to realize how often we’ve been denied the opportunities that we deserve.

In the end, we can still appreciate our life and be happy for what we have. Yet on the side, educate ourselves and make wiser choices.

I guarantee that we all deserve (and are worth) a little bit more.

Final Questions (because I can’t just ask one): How much does perception play into what salary I am currently making? How can I make smarter choices in regards to my pay, so that I always appreciate what I have?

 

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“Studies have shown that 90% of error in thinking is due to error in perception. If you can change your perception, you can change your emotion and this can lead to new ideas.”

–Edward de Bono

Credit:
Glamour’s article explaining pay: https://www.glamour.com/story/gal-gadot-got-paid-shockingly-little-for-her-role-in-wonder-woman

Glamour article referencing Gal’s opinion about her salary: https://www.glamour.com/story/gal-gadot-responds-to-the-wonder-woman-wage-gap-controversy

Wonder Woman Box Office: http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=wonderwoman.htm

Image: pixabay.com

Quote: brainyquote.com

 

xxCheers!

Why People have Affairs: Interesting Watch

Even though I hold no desire to cheat on my boyfriend, I was curious about this video posted by The School of Life. When it comes to hearing about infidelity, whether through personal relationships or through celebrities/strangers, I do my best to remain non-judgmental: I am not in your shoes, nor have I spent one day as any other soul on this planet. I wasn’t there in your relationship or have a full understanding of what you went through.

Whenever I travel with others, I often am amazed how a different self emerges. You can know someone for many years but still not have access to all the sides of their persona. I promise that there is a point to this. It is to state that unless you’ve done extensive traveling with acquaintances and casual friends, it is impossible to gather a fair insight into what is going on in their lives.

Therefore, I believe it’s best not to make judgments without the full story.

Even if things are going great in your relationship, or you may not be interested in anyone at the moment, I still highly suggest this video about why couples have affairs. It’s a brief watch at around 3 minutes, and is packed with fascinating insight. It is also narrated by one of my favorite people in this world, philosopher Alain de Botton.

One of the most essential takeaways from the video is that every person in a couple will have different needs of closeness/distance. Everyone carries their own measure of what constitutes a healthy degree of love, and it’s important to respect what your needs. It’s equally important to value the comfort of your partner, which will more than likely contrast yours.

In my relationship, I know that I am more distant than my boyfriend, and that I prefer a lot of space. This isn’t a slight against him–it’s entirely due to my feline-like/introverted nature. It was such a relief to learn that I am not a jerk and that there isn’t anything wrong with his desire for more closeness. It’s a balancing act that needs to be addressed and felt out.

The video’s message is that affairs in relationships occur because of one person not getting enough closeness/distance. I can see this happening in friendships too, but instead of “cheating” we resort to spending less time with someone or hanging out with other friends.

It’s necessary to regard how you feel and know how other people sit on the spectrum of closeness/distance. When everyone’s needs are respected/validated, than we can work together despite our differences.

 

A final question: Where do I fall on the spectrum of closeness/distance? Do I tend to require more or less closeness/distance in any of my relationships?

(Sorry that was two questions :))

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“You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.” –Plato

Credit:

Image credit: pixabay.com
Quote: Brainyquote.com

Video Information–>

Title: Why People Have Affairs

Creator: The School of Life

 

xxCheers!

A good place to start

For a good while now, something has seemed off. I have felt an increase of cynicism, an inability to tolerate much of what I willingly accepted in the past.

I believe that it is my gut, trying to push me into a direction that I’ve never before traveled. We can dim our inner voices for so long, that we forget what they sound like.

I have often asked myself, what am I searching for?  On this endless search, what discovery would serve as the end to the journey? I think a lot of it has to do with truth, an understanding for something far deeper than what awaits us on the surface…

Image credit: pixabay.com